The Art and History of Fly Tying

Fred Klein Author, Fly tyer and fisher of early traditional flies. Fly fishing historian, author and speaker.

My journey in pursuit of trout with the fly began 45 years ago with a new fly rod and instructions to cast and drift a fly. What a gift that was. The woods and waters of Pennsylvania, the Appalachian Mountains and beyond have brought a life of admiration for the wilderness,
forests, wildlife, and a thirst for “what lies beyond the next bend in the stream and over the mountain.”

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Tying In Hand

Guest Blogger: Eunan Hendron, Eunan Blogs @ Addicted to Vise

Jungle Ghost
Jungle Ghost 1 8xl – Tied in Hand

Tying in hand is the art of tying flies without a vise or bobbin. Not many folks tie their flies this way any longer; it is a dying art, often practiced only by those who tie classic Atlantic salmon flies. However, some of the greatest tyers of the 20th century tied all their flies by hand, prime examples being Ms. Carrie Stevens and many of the famous Catskill dry fly originators. These days there are a smattering of tyers, particularly in the Pacific Northwest who tie fishing flies in hand for steelhead and salmon, and there are those of us who tie in hand, purely for the fun of the challenge. I’m in no way an expert at the craft, but I’ve enjoyed the little bit that I have done so much that I wanted to share the experience.

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