Stick It Where The Sun Shines

Guest Blogger: Michael Vorhis, author of ARCHANGEL suspense thriller, OPEN DISTANCE adventure thriller & more to come

Figure 1: Loops

We’ve all acquired fly line or sink tip material that lacks end loops, or have blown through such a loop for one reason or another–either by putting too much pressure on a snag, or having a small-diameter leader cut through the loop material, or any of a number of ways to blow one out. Or we’ve attempted to tune our cast by modifying the taper of a given line by cutting off some of the line on the end, and now we need a new loop. Or we’ve sought to resurrect portions of a worn out line by using lengths of it as floating or sinking tip material, and each section needs loops. Or we’ve bought lines that have loops so small we can barely get the knot of a perfection loop through them. Or we’ve caught the belly of a good line on volcanic rock and damaged it to the point that we’d like to splice or loop-to-loop it back together.The point is that we’ve all had reason to want to add a loop to a line, or to repair a loop, or to otherwise join two line portions together. We could go old-school–nail-knots and bits of heavier mono–and that can be very strong…but once the ease of an integral line-loop is tasted, many of us prefer that cleaner-flex-profile configuration. We could tie perfection loops and coat the knots with goo, but those knots get big and our tip guides stay small. We could buy those after-market add-on loops, but one is never sure how well they’ll hold, and they introduce an anomaly in the line (as far as floating and degree of stiffness go), and they’re not necessarily an installable solution while on the stream. We could use epoxy to make a loop and suffer an overnight wait and a stiff section of line where it’s applied. We could trust superglue, equally stiff, but when it flexes the bond may break. We could follow those convoluted thirteen-step advice videos that would have us applying an open flame to the plastic coating of the line and melting ourselves a loop, subsequently to wonder whether we’d heated it too much or too little and how much it will really now hold.

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